Cover Art Contest for Coyote Card Game

Who is HeidleBÄR Games GmbH, you may ask? You can find more about us HereBut if you came to this page it means you were made aware of our plan to publish a card game around the well known Coyote, protagonist of many wonderful North American Tribal stories.Our goal is to feature Northwest Coastal art on the cover, and within, our game. We are looking for someone whose art embodies the Trickster known as Coyote. To that end we have decided to create a contest to find exceptional art for our game box cover, and for the game within.Art chosen for HeidelBÄR Games Coyote Game will be rewarded with an agreement for this project, which, among other things, includes 1000$ payment for the delivery of the final art work files and also 3 samples of the final game. It is needless to say that the name of the artist will be proudly displayed on the cover of the worldwide published game, and if desired also with a link to his online presence in the rules. Exposure through our online marketing channels would also be part of this agreement.
Sadly only one artist can be chosen. However, creating art always has meaning and we will reward the other 3 best submitted drafts with a free game of Coyote after it is published. Additionally we will feature their names and artwork in the final report of our contest, as well as promote this through our online channels, and via social media.We are looking for a Northwest regional style, specifically utilizing Formline Design common among the indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest, which we believe will work best for what we have in mind. We are looking for striking cover art, and some additional elements, which will make the playing cards attractive and distinctive. The following PDF includes more detailed information, specifying what we are looking for as a style. But we do not want to draw a too narrow frame. Art can only grow, if it has its freedom. So please do take this as a rough guide only.Per the Indian Arts and Craft Act of 1990*, we are accepting contestants who are recognized North American Tribal member (either by a Native American Tribe or by a state).

Download full PDF briefing here! So why a Coyote game made from us? Our game is about deception and outsmarting others, however it is meant to be a fun bluffing game for families and adults alike. We felt that the characterization of Coyote would be a good match. Additionally, we love to widen our own horizon as well as the one of people playing our games. A game should always tell a story, so why not tell this story?

You do not need to know anything about board and card games at all – this is what we can provide. But we need you to bring in your knowledge and art skills to create the appropriate, fun and fascinating setting.

We are lucky to have the wonderful Renée Roman Nose as a cultural advisor. She is helping us to reach out to the right community for this request. We also want to make sure that everything in publishing Native American art happens in a good way, with a good heart and a good mind.

So, if you are interested, we would need to find out what you envision as a cover design. We challenge you to hit us with a great cover art you imagine until the 17th of May. To submit your art, or if you have more questions, please contact us through this e-mail address: artwork@heidelbaer.de and tell us your name and Tribal affiliation. We will be verifying Tribal enrollment per the American Indian Arts and Crafts Act, so please be willing to provide your Tribal enrollment verification upon request.

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*The Indian Arts and Crafts Act (Act) of 1990 (P.L. 101-644) is a truth-in-advertising law that prohibits misrepresentation in the marketing of Indian arts and crafts products within the United States. It is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian or Indian tribe or Indian arts and crafts organization, resident within the United States. For a first time violation of the Act, an individual can face civil or criminal penalties up to a $250,000 fine or a 5-year prison term, or both. If a business violates the Act, it can face civil penalties or can be prosecuted and fined up to $1,000,000. Under the Act, an Indian is defined as a member of any federally or officially State recognized tribe of the United States, or an individual certified as an Indian artisan by an Indian tribe.